Paris Trip 2010 Day Seven – Fondation Henri Cartier-Bresson, Angelina and Le Malakoff

A week in Paris was like going down our hotel’s spiral staircase; it seemed to go on forever until you realized there was actually an end to it. Two more days and we’ll packing our way back home.

Paris 2010

Paris 2010

Jovie had a makeup job on this day for another bride-to-be. To save time, and for a change, we settled for Japanese lunch at the restaurant next door. Rice and seafood sounded nice and good.

Paris 2010
So, we parted our way after the meal; she headed back to hotel her job, and I was about to travel alone for the first time in this city. Where to go? The choice was obvious.

Traveling alone in a foreign city, I felt as if time moved slower, actions louder and emotions amplified.

Paris 2010

Escalator-maintenance guys inspecting the non-relevant item. They noticed me seconds later with my camera and giggled at each other.

Paris 2010

The cliché, the irony.

Paris 2010

The legend. The decisive moment. The heritage.

Paris 2010

I was greeted by Fondation Henric Cartier Bresson in the form of an unassuming and elegant building in a small and isolated cul-de-sac.

A nursery was just next door. Obviously photography wasn’t allowed within the building.

I paid my entrance fee of 6 Euros at the reception on the ground floor.  Exhibition rooms are located on the first and second floor, and a relaxing space on the third floor. Perhaps this was as close as I could get.

I was grateful to witness one of Irving Penn‘s monumental work on the exhibit. The Small Trades was a series of portraits in the early 50’s of skilled trades people dressed in their work clothes and carrying the tools of their respective trade from Paris, London, and New York. Newspaper seller, fishmonger, fireman, waiter,  rag picker, contortionist, seamstress, brick layer, chimney sweep. You name it. The subjects were intriguing and the prints were breathtaking.

Paris 2010

Made a short trip to Montparnasse Cemetery, another famous resting place of many illustrious Parisians.

To name a few  – Guy de Maupassant the novelist, Samuel Beckett the playwright and André Citroën who founded France’s Citroën automobile factory.

My mobile rang – she’s done. Enough of arts and history tour. Time for Angelina Jovie (no typo).

Paris 2010

The tea salon Angelina on the Rue de Rivoli is famous for its Mont Blanc and hot chocolate.

Paris 2010

Very very very sweet. That's all I can say.

Paris 2010

Think Milo-gao to the 5th power. Add some cream. That's somewhere close.

Paris 2010

No chance for Laduree. So we settled for the macaron at Angelina as well.

Paris 2010

Karl Lagerfeld's alter ego.

Paris 2010

Street performance was not unusual, but performing within the train added additional challenge of both time and space. Nonetheless, I was rather entertained and moved by the performance of the accordionist and his singer partner.

Paris 2010

You're welcome.

Paris 2010

Trocadero at night. To mark our one-week milestone in Paris, we decided to go for a feast in a better French restaurant.

Paris 2010

We wanted somewhere with tender escargots.

Paris 2010

Somewhere with rich and creamy foie gras.

Paris 2010

Somewhere that makes your partner look especially ravishing.

Paris 2010

Somewhere with well-browned and crisp duck confit.

Paris 2010

And somewhere that would end our night with a sweet and refreshing sorbet.

The service was excellent, as the waiter kept checking with us if there was anything we needed. With no wine, the meal at Le Malakoff costed us 69 Euros. We’ll definitely come back again some day.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *